Makers the new industrial revolution pdf

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Makers The New Industrial Revolution - [Free] Makers The New Industrial Revolution [PDF]. [EPUB] The Industrial Revolution was the transition. Editorial Reviews. Review. "A thrilling manifesto, a call to arms to quit your day job, pick up your Makers: The New Industrial Revolution by [Anderson, Chris]. THE NEW INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION. Page 2. 1) New enabling technologies lead to 2) new innovation models lead to 3) a new The Maker Movement.

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Makers The New Industrial Revolution Pdf

This books (Makers: The New Industrial Revolution [PDF]) Made by Chris Anderson About Books Makers "Wired "magazine editor and. Book Description: Wired magazine editor and bestselling author Chris Anderson takes you to the front lines of a new industrial revolution as. References. Creagh, Lucy et al. (eds). Modern Swedish Design: Three. Founding Texts. New York: MOMA. Halén, Widar and Wickman, Kerstin (eds).

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If you order a full 4 or 5 meters, you get the full reel with both connectors installed like the pic below. If you download less than a full reel, you'll get a single strip, but it will be a cut piece from a reel which may or may not have a connector on it.

If the piece comes from the end of the reel, the connector may be on the output end of the strip! Maker Faire: Tips for First-Time Exhibitors.

Hackerspace passport. Open source hardware - Skill badge, iron-on patch. Open source hardware - Sticker! Read more: The surprising link between science fiction and economic history The possibilities of billions of people connected by mobile devices, with unprecedented processing power, storage capacity, and access to knowledge, are unlimited.

And these possibilities will be multiplied by emerging technology breakthroughs in fields such as artificial intelligence, robotics, the Internet of Things, autonomous vehicles, 3-D printing, nanotechnology, biotechnology, materials science, energy storage, and quantum computing. Already, artificial intelligence is all around us, from self-driving cars and drones to virtual assistants and software that translate or invest.

Impressive progress has been made in AI in recent years, driven by exponential increases in computing power and by the availability of vast amounts of data, from software used to discover new drugs to algorithms used to predict our cultural interests. Digital fabrication technologies, meanwhile, are interacting with the biological world on a daily basis.

Engineers, designers, and architects are combining computational design, additive manufacturing, materials engineering, and synthetic biology to pioneer a symbiosis between microorganisms, our bodies, the products we consume, and even the buildings we inhabit.

Challenges and opportunities Like the revolutions that preceded it, the Fourth Industrial Revolution has the potential to raise global income levels and improve the quality of life for populations around the world.

To date, those who have gained the most from it have been consumers able to afford and access the digital world; technology has made possible new products and services that increase the efficiency and pleasure of our personal lives.

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Ordering a cab, booking a flight, downloading a product, making a payment, listening to music, watching a film, or playing a game—any of these can now be done remotely. In the future, technological innovation will also lead to a supply-side miracle, with long-term gains in efficiency and productivity.

Transportation and communication costs will drop, logistics and global supply chains will become more effective, and the cost of trade will diminish, all of which will open new markets and drive economic growth. At the same time, as the economists Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee have pointed out, the revolution could yield greater inequality, particularly in its potential to disrupt labor markets. As automation substitutes for labor across the entire economy, the net displacement of workers by machines might exacerbate the gap between returns to capital and returns to labor.

On the other hand, it is also possible that the displacement of workers by technology will, in aggregate, result in a net increase in safe and rewarding jobs. We cannot foresee at this point which scenario is likely to emerge, and history suggests that the outcome is likely to be some combination of the two.

However, I am convinced of one thing—that in the future, talent, more than capital, will represent the critical factor of production. In addition to being a key economic concern, inequality represents the greatest societal concern associated with the Fourth Industrial Revolution. The largest beneficiaries of innovation tend to be the providers of intellectual and physical capital—the innovators, shareholders, and investors—which explains the rising gap in wealth between those dependent on capital versus labor.

Technology is therefore one of the main reasons why incomes have stagnated, or even decreased, for a majority of the population in high-income countries: the demand for highly skilled workers has increased while the demand for workers with less education and lower skills has decreased. The result is a job market with a strong demand at the high and low ends, but a hollowing out of the middle.

This helps explain why so many workers are disillusioned and fearful that their own real incomes and those of their children will continue to stagnate. It also helps explain why middle classes around the world are increasingly experiencing a pervasive sense of dissatisfaction and unfairness. A winner-takes-all economy that offers only limited access to the middle class is a recipe for democratic malaise and dereliction.

Discontent can also be fueled by the pervasiveness of digital technologies and the dynamics of information sharing typified by social media. More than 30 percent of the global population now uses social media platforms to connect, learn, and share information.

Makers: The New Industrial Revolution by Chris Anderson - review | Books | The Guardian

In an ideal world, these interactions would provide an opportunity for cross-cultural understanding and cohesion. However, they can also create and propagate unrealistic expectations as to what constitutes success for an individual or a group, as well as offer opportunities for extreme ideas and ideologies to spread. The impact on business An underlying theme in my conversations with global CEOs and senior business executives is that the acceleration of innovation and the velocity of disruption are hard to comprehend or anticipate and that these drivers constitute a source of constant surprise, even for the best connected and most well informed.

Indeed, across all industries, there is clear evidence that the technologies that underpin the Fourth Industrial Revolution are having a major impact on businesses.

On the supply side, many industries are seeing the introduction of new technologies that create entirely new ways of serving existing needs and significantly disrupt existing industry value chains. Disruption is also flowing from agile, innovative competitors who, thanks to access to global digital platforms for research, development, marketing, sales, and distribution, can oust well-established incumbents faster than ever by improving the quality, speed, or price at which value is delivered.

Volume The New Industrial Revolution Chris.

Andrew Jackson. Canterbury Christ Church University. Oxford Academic. Google Scholar.

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Makers: The New Industrial Revolution by Chris Anderson

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