Reading like a writer francine prose pdf

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FRANCINE PROSE - Reading Like a Writer A Guide for People. Home · FRANCINE PROSE - Reading Like a Writer A Guide for People. READING. Like a. WRITER. A Guide for People Who Love Books and for Those Who Want to Write Them. FRANCINE PROSE. HarperCollins Publishers. Reading Like a Writer: A Guide for People Who Love Books and for Those Who Want to Write Them (P.S.) [Francine Prose] on aracer.mobi *FREE* shipping on .

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Reading Like A Writer Francine Prose Pdf

from Francine Prose's. ONE like the multiplication tables or the principles of auto mechanics, In the ongoing process of becoming a writer, I read and re-. 'Reading Like a Writer,' by Francine Prose - New York Times At the start of her new book on writing, Francine Prose dispatches with The. By reading the work of their predecessors and contemporaries, says Francine Prose. In Reading Like a Writer, Prose invites you to sit by her side and take a.

Now, like many of my colleagues, I find myself wondering just how much success I and my students can reasonably expect. Useful teaching texts are few. Another difficulty faced by writing teachers is, paradoxically, the lack of interest many students show in reading. And those who do read often lack the training to observe subtle writerly clues. As a student, I rarely heard the word mentioned, although, like Prose, I became a writer because books gave me such joy. Her insistence on that pleasure informs her method: View all New York Times newsletters. In each chapter, she quotes from authors who approach the subject in interesting ways. He was an anxious man, who worried about getting lost or sunburned or sick and so forth.

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Close Reading Can creative writing be taught? It's a reasonable question, but no matter how often I've been asked, I never know quite what to say. Because if what people mean is: Can the love of language be taught? Can a gift for storytelling be taught? Which may be why the question is so often asked in a skeptical tone implying that, unlike the multiplication tables or the principles of auto mechanics, creativity can't be transmitted from teacher to student.

Imagine Milton enrolling in a graduate program for help with Paradise Lost, or Kafka enduring the seminar in which his classmates inform him that, frankly, they just don't believe the part about the guy waking up one morning to find he's a giant bug.

What confuses me is not the sensibleness of the question but the fact that it's being asked of a writer who has taught writing, on and off, for almost twenty years.

What would it say about me, my students, and the hours we'd spent in the classroom if I said that any attempt to teach the writing of fiction was a complete waste of time? Probably, I should just go ahead and admit that I've been committing criminal fraud. Instead I answer by recalling my own most valuable experience, not as a teacher but as a student in one of the few fiction workshops I took. This was in the s, during my brief career as a graduate student in medieval English literature, when I was allowed the indulgence of taking one fiction class.

Its generous teacher showed me, among other things, how to line edit my work. For any writer, the ability to look at a sentence and see what's superfluous, what can be altered, revised, expanded, or especially cut is essential. It's satisfying to see that sentence shrink, snap into place, and ultimately emerge in a more polished form: clear, economical, sharp. Chapter 3, well, one has a finite amount of time in this world, and the less spent on this book, the better. You are very much in my reading list, Ma'am!

See all 4 reviews. Most helpful customer reviews on site. This book, which is both humorous and on point, is perhaps the best book that I've read about writing.

Prose refuses to set down any hard and fast rules, knowing that the best stories flout them, but continues to offer her advice in a piecemeal, by example sort of way. Her list of books at the end of Reading Like a Writer, and her insistence on reading and doing so carefully, helps us remember why we want to write in the first place.

Rarely have I read through a book like this so quickly, or am I so eager to do so again. This isn't the most exciting or compelling book, but it is less dry than Bloom. And it does have moments of great beauty. You can break Prose's book is really two books: In the first part,Prose teaches you how to break down a piece of fiction to the smallest pieces and then appreciate how those pieces are built up into a large, wonderful structure: Once you appreciate that, and can read with an eye that appreciates that beauty, taking your time, and savoring the author's ability.

In the second part, Prose confronts a lot of "rules" about writing, knocking them down with powerful examples. What you are left with is probably Prose's chief rule: If a writer can focus on interesting word choice, groundbreaking detail, and contrarian paths, they can surprise readers in a wonderful way. Finally, she concludes with a list of books that should be read immediately. This book probably appeals to a small group of writers and word nerds.

If you fall within that group, you can probably put this book to use, even if it is a bit dry. I am becoming more thrifty about book downloads and how many pairs of shoes I own, and more aware of how much pie I eat and going outside in any weather conditions. Francine Prose's book taught me new things, reminded me of things I knew but had forgotten, and also reinforced my best writing habits as I work on my novel-in-progress, THREAD.

I am jealous that her last name is Prose! A little joke.

This book allows readers and writers to understand their romance with words and stories, observation and creation. I checked it out at my local library, but I had to have it as a constant companion in my house--the way I keep good tea, favorite photos and friends nearby.

I loved the novel Household Saints and the movie. I was delighted to read this book and for pages I became a critical and analytical student of literature.

Prose used examples of the great literary master such as Tolstoy, Chekov and Maupassant and contemporary writers such as Denis Johnson. It was thrilling to have her explain the students reaction to a classic masterspiece.

FRANCINE PROSE - Reading Like a Writer A Guide for People - PDF Free Download

This book will transport the reader writer to a deeper understanding of the dynamics and structures of fiction and literature. I highly recommend! Julie E. I found this book to be incredibly helpful. Prose is clear and accessible, using excellent examples of quality writing and breaking it down into its mechanical parts, without sacrificing the love of the voice of the work.

I appreciated the way each chapter was dedicated to a different segment of quality writing. Her insistence on that pleasure informs her method: View all New York Times newsletters. In each chapter, she quotes from authors who approach the subject in interesting ways.

He was an anxious man, who worried about getting lost or sunburned or sick and so forth.

close reading francine prose

What very different conclusions we might form about a man who carries a bag filled with dice, syringes and a handgun. When she recalls advising students to stick to one point of view, or to avoid assigning two characters similar names, she remembers finding counterexamples in Chekhov.

Her notions of good writing are elastic and open-minded: Tell us what you think. Please upgrade your browser. See next articles.