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The Secret Race: Inside the Hidden World of the Tour de France by Tyler Hamilton. Read online, or download in secure EPUB format. The Secret Race: Inside the Hidden World of the Tour de France: Doping, Cover- ups, and Winning at All Costs by Daniel Coyle. Read online, or download in. Read "The Secret Race Inside the Hidden World of the Tour de France" by Tyler Hamilton available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your first.

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The Secret Race Ebook

The secret race [electronic resource (EPUB eBook)]: inside the hidden world of the Tour de France: doping, cover-ups, and winning at all costs / Tyler Hamilton. eBook . The result of this determination is The Secret Race, a book that pulls back the curtain and takes us into the secret world of professional cycling. Hamilton pulls back the curtain on the Tour de France and takes us into the secret world of professional cycling like never before: the doping, the lying, and his.

Click to see if another is available for you to purchase. Over the course of two years, New York Times bestselling author Daniel Coyle conducted more than two hundred hours of interviews with Hamilton and spoke with numerous teammates, rivals, and friends. The result is an explosive page-turner of a book that takes us deep inside a shadowy, fascinating, and surreal world of unscrupulous doctors, anything-goes team directors, and athletes so relentlessly driven to win that they would do almost anything to gain an edge. For the first time, Hamilton recounts his own battle with depression and tells the story of his complicated relationship with Lance Armstrong. This edition features a new Afterword, in which the authors reflect on the developments within the sport, and involving Armstrong, over the past year. The Secret Race is a courageous, groundbreaking act of witness from a man who is as determined to reveal the hard truth about his sport as he once was to win the Tour de France. With a new Afterword by the authors.

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Unavailable for download. Continue shopping Checkout Continue shopping. See Other Editions. Skip this list. Ratings and Book Reviews 8 23 star ratings 8 reviews. Overall rating 4. He can push through. He likes pushing through. Cycling was a perfect sport for him. Unfortunately, despite his obvious natural talent, his best barely registered on a sliding scale of doping and performance enhancement that had taken over the sport.

Everyone else was doing it too.

The Secret Race

Doping leveled the playing field if everyone was involved, right? Not quite. To really dumb down the science, everyone has a natural level of hematocrit or amount of red blood cells in their blood. Reading this book cast the many summers I spent watching cycling in a totally different light.

Events I watched live on television that had seemed like supreme athletic achievements were described very differently by Hamilton. Secret cell phones, code names and messages, an EPO messenger on a motorcycle meeting the team at predetermined spots. The idea that an entire sport could be dominated by superior athletes who could transform themselves into demi-gods was too good and too lucrative to pass up. A one-man breakaway over a hundred miles? A man winning the most demanding sports contest year after year after year post-cancer?

Too ridiculous to be true, but look how much money he can make us. Why would Lance Armstrong—a man near possessed by the desire to win—simply give up? It was better for him to ride off in a cloud of maybes and probablys than lose definitively the only thing cycling fans have left of him: View all 3 comments.

As an avid cyclist who has followed the sport for the past quarter century, I was saddened and moved, but not shocked, by this book. The recent histories of Lance Armstrong, Tyler Hamilton and that of doping in cycling have been well covered in the mass media. Still, this book tells a captivating story of one man's struggle with conflicting and riddling motivations and explores all facets - light and dark - of human ambition. The writing style is fast and highly accessible.

I read the book in on As an avid cyclist who has followed the sport for the past quarter century, I was saddened and moved, but not shocked, by this book. I read the book in one go, and was totally engrossed by it. Perhaps it was an easy read for me because i was already very familiar with the arcane names and technical cycling terminology. But i'd like to think that the very compelling human story was presented well enough to captivate anybody looking to read a tragic story of personal bravery and morality.

When I first read several years ago that Tyler Hamilton had been busted for dope, I was deeply saddened. He had seemed like such a likeable fellow. I think that he has now redeemed himself well by writing this book. As for Lance Armstrong, well, the book did not change my feelings of ambivalence about him, either for better or worse.

Clearly, he is a man who has performed deeds that are historically heroic. However, it's sad that such a lifetime of achievement is shrouded in a personality that is so darkened by arrogance, hubris and disdain for others. In short, even heroes can be world-class dickheads. View 1 comment. Jul 26, Andrew Smith rated it really liked it Shelves: This book really does explain how and how much doping went on at the time Lance Armstrong was taking the cycling world by storm in winning the Tour de France seven times.

It's told in a pretty matter if fact way by one of his team and shows, very clearly, the difficult choices facing top professional cyclists at this time: It also makes it clear that, as the cyclists reacted differently to the products and some gained more than others due to This book really does explain how and how much doping went on at the time Lance Armstrong was taking the cycling world by storm in winning the Tour de France seven times.

It also makes it clear that, as the cyclists reacted differently to the products and some gained more than others due to certain 'natural state' measures, the fact that virtually all top cyclists were using EPO and other substances did not render it a level playing field.

The Secret Race by Tyler Hamilton - Penguin Books Australia

The most fascinating aspects for me were the accounts of how the drugs were administered - in the midst of some pretty basic and flawed testing processes - and the understanding of how this 'secret' was kept under wraps for so long. It also did drive home just how false the results were during this period. A really interesting tale particularly if, like me, you're addicted to the annual July event that draws in more watchers than any other sporting event in the world!

View all 21 comments. It will be hard for me to read.

I have been anti Armstrong since and knew he doped but nobody believed me but a few cycling friends. On the other hand it will be much better to read about him now that the whole world knows what he is like Hard because I will probably read how he got way with so much for all those years.

Never understood the admiration. His bullying ways were so obvious plus he and his team mates all of a sudden became so good. When he won the tour in I was happ It will be hard for me to read. When he won the tour in I was happy for him, but in he showed what a despicable man he was in the way he treated others, and yes I started to dislike him, which turned to disgust. Just finished reading this book. I loved it. The world I thought I knew so much about Yes I knew about doping and expected Lance and his whole tam to have a trick where they could dope and not be found out turned out to be even worse!

And yes I also wondered if lance would test positively, if the Tour de France would want the world to know. I remember all those years that when I said something negatively about Armstrong, his fans who were always telling me. He has been tested times and never tested positive. But because he was a hero according to many they let him bully them. All those journalists that licked his ball. Now they are all apologizing for not doing their work.

Back to the book. Great story although I did feel that Tyler was still making excuses about him doping. Everybody did it. No that was not true. But the story he is telling is really important so kudos to him, and I respect Floyd Landis for finally being honest for a change. One of few that stood against Armstrong. View all 14 comments. Sep 15, James rated it it was amazing. I'm an amateur cyclist, but follow international pro racing with great interest.

Of course, the use of illegal performance enhancing drugs is a hot topic, and the author, Tyler Hamilton was one of the good guys with huge talent and heart I remember watching on TV for years. I must be naive, because I thought it was all talent it wasn't and he was a hero of sorts to me.

Then, like Icarus flying too close to the sun, he fell into the sea, and this is his tell all. It's not your typical sports mem I'm an amateur cyclist, but follow international pro racing with great interest.

It's not your typical sports memoir; it's really more of a tragedy, and that's why the book should appeal to readers who aren't necessarily cycling fans. I used to be a Lance Armstrong fan too. No more. I don't care how much money he raised for cancer awareness. I stopped following him on twitter.

View 2 comments. Sep 07, Jonathan rated it it was amazing. Surprisingly well-written! Tyler's voice doesn't come across as whiny or self-pitying. I remember watching these TdF mountain top finishes almost a decade ago, and it's fascinating to read about what was actually going on.

The actual doping is the least of the story; the cloak-and-dagger machinery to pull it off is a page-turning thriller. That all the top guys doped isn't much of a story anymore, tho Surprisingly well-written! That all the top guys doped isn't much of a story anymore, though it's interesting to read about how Armstrong did it more systematically and better than anyone else.

The Secret Race

And his surprisingly vindictive pursuit of Lemond, Hamilton etc. Sep 15, Kevin Hollins rated it it was amazing. After I closed the book after reading it in one sitting , my final thought was: But the really unsatisfying thing to think about isnow what?

Every top ten finisher during those years was doped as well. Did that make it a level playing field? Some research indicates that different riders have different results from the same drug, so even that answer is unsatis After I closed the book after reading it in one sitting , my final thought was: Some research indicates that different riders have different results from the same drug, so even that answer is unsatisfying. How does the UCI, even if it were so inclined, find the "wronged" cyclist who truly deserves the jersey?

If there is a silver lining for those years, it is that those Tours got more Americans interested in cycling, and that interest created opportunities for younger racers who thankfully are racing in a much more drug-intolerant time. As for Lance, he may be a narcissist at heart, but he's given hope to a lot of people at times in their lives when they really needed it. My respect for Tyler who wrote great articles for VeloNews during those years has grown; it took courage for him to lay it all on the table.

My respect for Lance has fallen, as again, even if half of what I read about his interpersonal skills is true, he doesn't sound like the Cincinnatus of cycling his early PR portrayed him to be. Perhaps by getting it all out there, cycling can more forward with a clean start.

If that happens, the uncomfortable subjects addressed in the book will have been worth it. Seriously considered five stars. I held back, not out of any flaw, but simply to leave room for more transcendant titles at the top of the scale.

This is an excellent sports autobiography. I was fascinated with the sport when Hamilton was a star. I grew less so after the scandals started, but The Secret Race is an excellent counter to any of the cheap morality tales that pe Seriously considered five stars. I grew less so after the scandals started, but The Secret Race is an excellent counter to any of the cheap morality tales that people tried to make out of doping.

His story is a counter to the idea that dopers are a few bad apples who take short-cuts and cheat honest competitors. The Secret Race really is a moral tale for our age. This was a fabulous book to read after Epstein's The Sports Gene. I was motivated to do so after reading Malcolm Gladwell's editorial on the two, but I'm amazed at how absolutely thoroughly Gladwell missed the point. The answer to doping is not legalization. That won't create the mythical level playing field, it will just favor those who get more boost out of doping.

The answer is in Epstein's work: But I digress. The Secret Race is a great read for a fan of recent cycling history.

It is as much about Lance Armstrong as it is about Tyler Hamilton and there are no winners in its pages, but it is worth reading. It really is a morality tale for our time. Oct 25, Elyse Walters rated it it was amazing. The important 'human' lesson: My husband loved this book I love him I loved reading this book 'with' him Sep 15, Kalen rated it really liked it Shelves: The Secret Race didn't tell me much I didn't already know about bike racing's dark side but it did fill in some details.

You got a good teaser when Hamilton appeared on 60 Minutes, but take the time to read this book for more of the story.

Anyone who thinks that Lance Armstrong rode clean needs to read this book though to me it is less about Armstrong and more about the culture of the pro peloton overall. What Hamilton and Coyle do well where the subject of Armstrong is concerned is to draw a full picture of the rider. People who don't follow the sport see smiling public Lance, fiercely-determined Lance on the bike. Anyone who follows the sport knows about the outbursts and the infamous "look" but The Secret Race creates a deeper profile, told by someone who lived in close proximity to Armstrong and even roomed with him.

The other thing the book does well is explain the complicity of the UCI, especially to those who may not be aware of this dark, dirty secret. Lots and lots of money was being made by lots and lots of people off the success of their golden boy. Hamilton included. The things I learned: Who knew?! A lot pro bike racers are pricks. The thing I still don't understand: How did Motoman get access to ride through the peloton? Was he working for the team in some official capacity beyond his unofficial capacity?

I can't just hop on a motorcycle and cruise through the peloton handing people things. No one can. I do believe The Secret Race is more fact than fiction and while it may be fueled by anger, it is also fueled by a desire to finally tell the whole truth at least as Hamilton saw it --about Lance, the UCI, and the sport as a whole.

I don't think Hamilton is the good guy here--he benefited a lot, financially and otherwise, until he didn't. I'm glad he feels better for having come clean so to speak. The culture of lies and deceit in bike racing is so deep and widespread, I honestly don't believe any of them fully--even Hamilton--about anything anymore.

Except maybe Jens. First I feel like I have to make full disclosure; Before yellow wristbands, before Tour de France victories, before cancer, before the World Cycling Championships, even before the Olympics, I did not care for Lance Edward Armstrong. When I bought this book, I did not believe that I would be swayed either way. Secondly, I used to be a huge Tyler Hamilton fan. I remember first reading about him when he won the NCAA cycling championships in and there was always something likable perha First I feel like I have to make full disclosure; Before yellow wristbands, before Tour de France victories, before cancer, before the World Cycling Championships, even before the Olympics, I did not care for Lance Edward Armstrong.

I remember first reading about him when he won the NCAA cycling championships in and there was always something likable perhaps even honest about him. After he failed the tests in I was not devastated but greatly disappointed. Since reading this book, I have come back to being a fan because he has chosen to speak out when many others have not and I find that admirable.

I find the book well written. Even with the co-author you get the sense that you are hearing Tyler tell the story.

There are parts of it that are not perfectly linear as though it is a collection of recollections. At one point while discussing the season he mentions seeing Bjarne Riis in and my first thought was, "He is a place where the critics will say his memory is foggy" thus discrediting the whole book.

As I read on I realized that in describing what was going on in Europe with drugs that his recollection of Riis was so precise that he used an incident from to describe what he learned in ' Although Mr. Armstrong does not come out well in the book, this is not a greedy attempt to, "Get Lance" as some people will say.

In the times when he does point a finger at Armstrong he makes it very clear that Hamilton is pointing three at himself. He fully acknowledges that participating in this world was his choice because he opted to be professional a term meaning do what it takes i.

The story itself is very compelling and interesting even if you do not know much about professional cycling. It tells the story of what it is like to make it in the sport.

Hamilton talks candidly about the sacrifices others, such as other riders and support personnel have to make in order to win a grand tour. If you know something about cycling you will feel like you have been there among the brotherhood on a top level team. This is probably the only book Tyler Hamilton will write and I am glad that I read it.

Download The Secret Race: Inside the Hidden World of the Tour de France Ebook Free

Jan 22, Ben rated it really liked it. As a high level amateur and collegiate racer for the last decade, I have followed closely the roller-coaster ride of Lance Armstrong, Postal, and all the rest of it.

I was determined not to view Tyler H. He does a tremendous job of building up to that now famous question, "what would you do? It answers so many questions like, how Lance could be so much better than everyone else? How can whole teams dominate major races? How can big guys win mountain stages?

May 07, Pages. Sep 05, Pages. Sep 05, Minutes. Over the course of two years, New York Times bestselling author Daniel Coyle conducted more than two hundred hours of interviews with Hamilton and spoke with numerous teammates, rivals, and friends. The result is an explosive page-turner of a book that takes us deep inside a shadowy, fascinating, and surreal world of unscrupulous doctors, anything-goes team directors, and athletes so relentlessly driven to win that they would do almost anything to gain an edge.

For the first time, Hamilton recounts his own battle with depression and tells the story of his complicated relationship with Lance Armstrong. This edition features a new Afterword, in which the authors reflect on the developments within the sport, and involving Armstrong, over the past year. The Secret Race is a courageous, groundbreaking act of witness from a man who is as determined to reveal the hard truth about his sport as he once was to win the Tour de France.

With a new Afterword by the authors. The Secret Race is a definitive look at the world of professional cycling—and the doping issue surrounding this sport and its most iconic rider, Lance Armstrong—by former Olympic gold medalist Tyler Hamilton and New York Times bestselling author Daniel Coyle. Over the course of two years, Coyle conducted more than two hundred hours of interviews with Hamilton and spoke candidly with numerous teammates, rivals, and friends.

The result is an explosive book that takes us, for the first time, deep inside a shadowy, fascinating, and surreal world of unscrupulous doctors, anything-goes team directors, and athletes so relentlessly driven to succeed that they would do anything—and take any risk, physical, mental, or moral—to gain the edge they need to win.

In the Tour de France, he finished fourth despite breaking his collarbone in the early stages—and grinding eleven of his teeth down to the nerves along the way.

He started his career with the U. But just weeks after Hamilton reached his own personal pinnacle—winning the gold medal at the Olympics—his career came to a sudden, ignominious end: