Kautilya arthashastra in pdf

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Kautilya's Arthashastra. 3. Book I, "Concerning Discipline". CHAPTER I. THE LIFE OF A KING. Óm. Salutation to Sukra and Brihaspati. This Arthasástra is made. PDF | It is almost a unanimously accepted view that The Wealth of How to cite this paper: Sihag, B.S. () Kautilya's Arthashastra: A. In his groundbreaking Arthashastra, Chanakya a.k.a. Kautilya (c. - BCE) lists seven pillars for an organisation. "The king, the minister, the country, the.

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Kautilya Arthashastra In Pdf

19 फ़रवरी Kautilya Arthashastra is a book which deals with Indian statecraft, economy policy and military strategy. The book is originally written in Sanskrit. aracer.mobification: Literature aracer.mobi: Arthasastra Of Kautilya aracer.mobi: ptiff dc. type: pdf. Identifier: aracer.mobi Identifier-ark. KAUTILYA KA ARTHSHASTRA - HINDI - KAUTILYA.

Introduction 1. Kautilya and Arthashastra Much of our knowledge about state policy under the Mauryas comes from Arthashastra written by Kautilya more popularly known as Chanakya , who was a Brahmin minister under Chandrgupta Maurya. Though it was written at the end of the fourth century BC, it appears to have been rediscovered only in , after centuries of oblivion. The treatise in its present form is most likely not the text written by Kautilya, though it is probably based on a text that was authored by Kautilya; and is no case can the text in its entirely be ascribed to Kautilya on account of numerous stylistic linguistic variations. It is not an account of Mauryan administration. The title Arthashastra, which means "the science of material Gain" or "science of Polity", doesnot leave any doubts about its ends. According to Kautilya, the ruler should use any means to attain his goal and his actions required to moral sanction. The only problems discussed are the most practical kind. Though the kings were allowed a free rein, the citizens were subject to a 1 R.

The attribution to schools will not find favour with an orthodox Pandit. One could not divine reasons for supposing that Jaimini Sutra, Badarayana's Vedanta Sutra or Baudhayana's Dharmasutra belong to schools and not to individual authors. Not that we do not accept any school as such. But it is more reasonable to assume that originally a certain Jaimini or Badarayana flourished and propounded certain doctrines which were accepted and followed by their devoted disciples.

To-day while one Hindu follows Apastamba his neighbor follows Baudhayana. This means that the former belongs to the Apastamba school while the latter is of the Baudhayana school. What is the underlying idea? Originally when Apastamba propounded his theory it appealed to certain members of the community. They followed them and then their descendants. Thus the school automatically came into being.

But it may be asked, how could we explain the peculiar use of "Iti Kautilya," "Iti Baudhayana. The answer is simple. In India literature is broadly classified into two heads, the sutra and the beeja. The sutra is an original work composed by master minds on a certain subject or subjects.

It may be philosophy, theology. The sutras in themselves are a strenuous reading and especially so, when they deal with abstruse and technical sciences. It was not possible for all persons to grasp them. Hence interpreters came into being.

Their works were bhashyas or interpretations of the sutras in popular style. The sutrakaras generally-there are also exceptions,used the phrase "Iti Baudhayana. On the other hand a bhashyakara could not speak with such definiteness. For, oftentimes, more than one interpretation may be placed upon a certain phrase or passage.

It depends to a large extent on the ingenuity of the writer. Some interpretations might be ingenious but could not win general approval.

Therefore, the bhaskaras are justified in omitting their names. In the light of this can we still maintain that Iti Kautilya is a serious argument against the authenticity of the work? We cannot follow Prof.

Keith when he advances the argument that under the explanation of the term in the last book of the Arthasastra is cited one of Kautilya's sentences from which the prima facie conclusion is that Kautilya is cited as an authority and not as the author.

This science has been composed by Kautalya, easily understandable, correct in the exposition of truth and in the use of words, and all free from errors.

Meyer in his translation of the Arthashastra furnishes a convincing reply. It is a commonplace practice in India to give the author's name in his world.

Jacobi's observations are to the point: "The agreement obtaining between the words of Kautalya and the character of his work, and the personality that characterises them would be difficult to understand, if those were not the very words of the author.

A later writer who wanted to palm off his own lubrication of that of his school on the name of the famous statesman, would surely have faltered somewhere. From this view-point the higher criticism must acknowledge the authenticity of the Kautaliya. Crooked' or 'Crookedness personified'. There has been a war of words about the name Kautalya.

Some manuscripts contain the word Kautilya while others Kautalya. It is asked whether a minister would style himself Kautilya meaning "Mr. Crooked" or "Crookedness personified". Granting that it is Kautilya, such nicknames are not uncommon in ancient India. Mention may be made of a few; Vatavyadhi the wind-diseased is no other than Uddhava, a relative of Krishna according to the Puranas.

Pisuna tale-bearer is another name for the sage Narada; this is also the name of the Brahman minister of king Dushyanta according to Kalidasa's Shakuntala. Kaunapadanta the teeth of the Rakshasas is identified with Indra, the God of Heaven. To advance such feeble arguments with regard to the name of the author, demonstrates their weakness in all nakedness. There is, however, another reading Kautalya which may be adopted with advantage and which may silence all controversy so far as this particular topic goes.

Not only is there the authority of the manuscripts for this but also there is inscriptional evidence besides lexicographical. Ganapati Sastri says that the term Kautilya is certainly a misnomer. For, neither the term Kautilya nor its root Kutila as explained in the Nighantas Gotra and crooked.

On the other hand the word Kutala is mentioned by Kesavasvamin in his NiHarthar savasamkepa as meaning both Gotra and an ornament.

It is then obvious that the name is derived from the root Kutala. If it is granted that the patronymic is Kutala then we cannot grammatically derive Kautilya but only Kautalya.

Secondly, there is the testimony which bears to the fact that all the manuscripts of the text and the commentaries relating to the same invariably contain the expression Kautalya and not Kautilya. It is difficult to understand how Indian and European scholars have failed to notice this in handling the manuscripts when editing and publishing them. Apparently some have noted it but have not utilised it, for example in Jolly's edition.

Evidently Jolly discarded the correct reading Kautalya. It may he that in his opinion it was a wrong reading. That Kautalya is the correct reading is attested to by another literary evidence.

It appears that Kautalya is the family name of Vishnugupta, the family name being derived from the patron saint or Kutala by the addition of derivative suffix 'ya'.

Last but not the least is the invaluable inscriptional evidence supplied to us by D. He writes: "I have found an inscription from the village near Dholka in Gujarat which in clearly reads Kautalya. It records that Vastupala the famous Jain minister of the Vaghela king who built a temple of Gajesvara in as equated to Kautalya in statesmanship. This inscription is valuable to us in more than one respect. Not only does it show that the name Kautilya is the misspelling of the name Kautalya but also it bears witness to the fact that Kautalya is acknowledged to be a statesman and not at as Gotra and crooked.

On the other hand the word Kutala is mentioned by Kesavasvamin. It silences two important arguments in regard to the name of the author and the authenticity of the work. But it may be asked why the name Kautilya also sticks on in some Indian literature. Only one explanation can be offered and that is due to the ingenuity with which Visakhadatta invested his character Kautilya in his famous play Judrartikmsa.

For the purpose of his play he perhaps drew from his imagination a name which being a twisting of the original name answered his purpose well. Dramatic literature says being a popular branch of literature the wrong name might haye caught the fancy of the masses and might have eventuaily become a by-word for 'crookedness' or 'crooked policy'.

Kautalya is known not by one or two names, but by a number of names. These are Vatsyayana, Kautalya. Dramila, Yami, Vishnugupta, Angula. The Vaijayantl of Yadavaprakasa cir A. Please check copyright law within your country before downloading the books. In case of any issues send us an email.

It is argued that the discussions in the Arthashastra generally end by stating the author's opinion with the words: "Iti Kautilya. But Pataii. To an ordinary Sanskrit Pandit in India the phrase connotes no special significance. It is always taken for granted that such works, where expressions like "Iti Kautalyal;," "Iti Baudhayana;" etc.

The attribution to schools will not find favour with an orthodox Pandit. One could not divine reasons for supposing that Jaimini Sutra, Badarayana's Vedanta Sutra or Baudhayana's Dharmasutra belong to schools and not to individual authors.

Arthashastra of Chanakya – English Translation

Not that we do not accept any school as such. But it is more reasonable to assume that originally a certain Jaimini or Badarayana flourished and propounded certain doctrines which were accepted and followed by their devoted disciples.

To-day while one Hindu follows Apastamba his neighbor follows Baudhayana. This means that the former belongs to the Apastamba school while the latter is of the Baudhayana school.

Chanakya Arthashastra PDF in Hindi, English, Sanskrit - All About Bharat

What is the underlying idea? Originally when Apastamba propounded his theory it appealed to certain members of the community. They followed them and then their descendants. Thus the school automatically came into being. But it may be asked, how could we explain the peculiar use of "Iti Kautilya," "Iti Baudhayana. The answer is simple. In India literature is broadly classified into two heads, the sutra and the beeja. The sutra is an original work composed by master minds on a certain subject or subjects.

It may be philosophy, theology.

KAUTILYA KA ARTHSHASTRA - HINDI - KAUTILYA

The sutras in themselves are a strenuous reading and especially so, when they deal with abstruse and technical sciences. It was not possible for all persons to grasp them. Hence interpreters came into being. Their works were bhashyas or interpretations of the sutras in popular style. The sutrakaras generally-there are also exceptions,used the phrase "Iti Baudhayana. On the other hand a bhashyakara could not speak with such definiteness. For, oftentimes, more than one interpretation may be placed upon a certain phrase or passage.

It depends to a large extent on the ingenuity of the writer. Some interpretations might be ingenious but could not win general approval.

Therefore, the bhaskaras are justified in omitting their names. In the light of this can we still maintain that Iti Kautilya is a serious argument against the authenticity of the work?

We cannot follow Prof. Keith when he advances the argument that under the explanation of the term in the last book of the Arthasastra is cited one of Kautilya's sentences from which the prima facie conclusion is that Kautilya is cited as an authority and not as the author.

This science has been composed by Kautalya, easily understandable, correct in the exposition of truth and in the use of words, and all free from errors. Meyer in his translation of the Arthashastra furnishes a convincing reply. It is a commonplace practice in India to give the author's name in his world.

Jacobi's observations are to the point: "The agreement obtaining between the words of Kautalya and the character of his work, and the personality that characterises them would be difficult to understand, if those were not the very words of the author. A later writer who wanted to palm off his own lubrication of that of his school on the name of the famous statesman, would surely have faltered somewhere.

From this view-point the higher criticism must acknowledge the authenticity of the Kautaliya. Crooked' or 'Crookedness personified'. There has been a war of words about the name Kautalya. Some manuscripts contain the word Kautilya while others Kautalya. It is asked whether a minister would style himself Kautilya meaning "Mr. Crooked" or "Crookedness personified". Granting that it is Kautilya, such nicknames are not uncommon in ancient India.

Kautilya-arthashastra-marathi-part-1.pdf

Mention may be made of a few; Vatavyadhi the wind-diseased is no other than Uddhava, a relative of Krishna according to the Puranas. Pisuna tale-bearer is another name for the sage Narada; this is also the name of the Brahman minister of king Dushyanta according to Kalidasa's Shakuntala.

Kaunapadanta the teeth of the Rakshasas is identified with Indra, the God of Heaven. To advance such feeble arguments with regard to the name of the author, demonstrates their weakness in all nakedness. There is, however, another reading Kautalya which may be adopted with advantage and which may silence all controversy so far as this particular topic goes.

Not only is there the authority of the manuscripts for this but also there is inscriptional evidence besides lexicographical. Ganapati Sastri says that the term Kautilya is certainly a misnomer. For, neither the term Kautilya nor its root Kutila as explained in the Nighantas Gotra and crooked. On the other hand the word Kutala is mentioned by Kesavasvamin in his NiHarthar savasamkepa as meaning both Gotra and an ornament.

It is then obvious that the name is derived from the root Kutala. If it is granted that the patronymic is Kutala then we cannot grammatically derive Kautilya but only Kautalya.

Secondly, there is the testimony which bears to the fact that all the manuscripts of the text and the commentaries relating to the same invariably contain the expression Kautalya and not Kautilya.

It is difficult to understand how Indian and European scholars have failed to notice this in handling the manuscripts when editing and publishing them. Apparently some have noted it but have not utilised it, for example in Jolly's edition.

Evidently Jolly discarded the correct reading Kautalya. It may he that in his opinion it was a wrong reading. That Kautalya is the correct reading is attested to by another literary evidence. It appears that Kautalya is the family name of Vishnugupta, the family name being derived from the patron saint or Kutala by the addition of derivative suffix 'ya'.

Last but not the least is the invaluable inscriptional evidence supplied to us by D. He writes: "I have found an inscription from the village near Dholka in Gujarat which in clearly reads Kautalya. It records that Vastupala the famous Jain minister of the Vaghela king who built a temple of Gajesvara in as equated to Kautalya in statesmanship.

This inscription is valuable to us in more than one respect. Not only does it show that the name Kautilya is the misspelling of the name Kautalya but also it bears witness to the fact that Kautalya is acknowledged to be a statesman and not at as Gotra and crooked.

On the other hand the word Kutala is mentioned by Kesavasvamin. It silences two important arguments in regard to the name of the author and the authenticity of the work. But it may be asked why the name Kautilya also sticks on in some Indian literature.

Only one explanation can be offered and that is due to the ingenuity with which Visakhadatta invested his character Kautilya in his famous play Judrartikmsa.