WIT. By Margaret Edson. ▫. CHARACTERS ▫. VIVIAN BEARING, PH.D. 50; professor of seventeenth-century poetry at the university. JASON POSNER. 30; clinical. Editorial Reviews. aracer.mobi Review. Wit is that rare beast: art that engages both the heart and the mind. "It is not my intention to give away the plot," Vivian. Wit: A Play. by Margaret Edson. Margaret Edson won the Pulitzer Prize drama award for her play W;t. It is about a professor of 17th century poetry and her.

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Wit Margaret Edson Pdf

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Drama, the New York Drama Critics Circle Award, the Drama Desk Award, the Outer Critics Circle Award, the Lucille Lortel. Read Wit PDF - A Play by Margaret Edson Farrar | Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Drama, the New York Drama Critics Circle Award, the. Get this from a library! Wit: a play. [Margaret Edson] -- "In this play, Margaret Edson has created a work that is as intellectually challenging as it is emotionally .

What we as her audience take away from this remarkable drama is a keener sense that, while death is real and unavoidable, our lives are ours to cherish or throw away—a lesson that can be both uplifting and redemptive. As the playwright herself puts it, "The play is not about doctors or even about cancer. It's about kindness, but it shows arrogance. It's about compassion, but it shows insensitivity. Is the way we live our lives and interact with others more important than what we achieve materially, professionally, or intellectually? How does language figure into our lives? Can science and art help us conquer death, or our fear of it? What will seem most important to each of us about life as that life comes to an end? The immediacy of the presentation, and the clarity and elegance of Edson's writing, make this sophisticated, multilayered play accessible to almost any interested reader. As the play begins, Vivian Bearing, a renowned professor of English who has spent years studying and teaching the intricate, difficult Holy Sonnets of the seventeenth-century poet John Donne, is diagnosed with advanced ovarian cancer. Confident of her ability to stay in control of events, she brings to her illness the same intensely rational and painstakingly methodical approach that has guided her stellar academic career. But as her disease and its excruciatingly painful treatment inexorably progress, she begins to question the single-minded values and standards that have always directed her, finally coming to understand the aspects of life that make it truly worth living.

While the doctors are cold and unfeeling, they are still doing their best to fight death; there is a kind hearted nurse who assumes the role of caretaker. It could lead us to ask the question about which is more important: a doctor that holds our hand and does nothing to fix us or to teach others the skills; or a doctor that is quite competent, even if a bit cold.

I don't think the play answers this question, though the preference of the author comes through.

Instead, I think there is a lot of room to disagree with the author, and make our own decisions. She leaves enough up in the air to not shove a set answer down your throat.

In fact, one of the kindest acts in the entire show was performed by a woman who was herself an intellectual, hard headed and non-compromising. This shows that there is room for both intellectualism and emotion. A good philosophical exploration of a serious question. And, in the end, this one did. Wit is both heart wrenching and inspirational.

The central character--Vivian--is diagnosed with stage 4 ovarian cancer and undergoes 8 rounds of an experimental treatment at their maximum dosage. Through the course of Vivian's diagnosis and treatment, we see reflections of her life as a Professor of Poetry specializing in the Holy Sonnets of John Donne. Wit is one of those texts that stops you in your tracks with its raw exploration of Vivian's coming to terms with her cancer and the fact that she is terminal.

The focus of the play, however, isn't on Vivian's impending death but rather the focus is on an inspirational exploration of the human spirit as she reflects on her life and the choices she made with both acerbity and a dry humor.

Vivian Bearing, a respected professor and scholar of the works of John Donne, is diagnosed with stage four ovarian cancer and has to undergo intense chemotherapy if there is to be any recovery. During the course of her treatment, Bearing gets sicker and more introspective. We get a lesson in literature as she receives a lesson in life.

Wit: A Play

The vignettes we get of her past show that she was offered the choice to expand her horizons beyond literature but stuck with her studies. In the end, the good professor lets a bit of the outside world in as the cancer takes over. Bearing is constantly breaking the fourth wall, there is overlapping dialogue, and there are no real scene or act breaks.

That being said, it is a engaging piece of modern literature and a heck of a debut play. All in all, a decent read. This is the first thing she ever wrote. In fact, it's the only thing she's ever written except for one other play a few years ago that hasn't ever been staged.

Wit : a play

Susie wears white jeans, white sneakers, and a different blouse each entrance. Scenes are indicated by a line rule in the script; there is no break in the action between scenes, but there might be a change in lighting.

There is no intermission. Vivian has a central-venous-access catheter over her left breast, so the IV tubing goes there, not into her arm. The IV pole, with a Port-a-Pump attached, rolls easily on wheels. Every time the IV pole reappears, it has a different configu- ration of bottles. She is fifty, tall and very thin, barefoot, and com- pletely bald.

Is the way we live our lives and interact with others more important than what we achieve materially, professionally, or intellectually? How does language figure into our lives? Can science and art help us conquer death, or our fear of it? What will seem most important to each of us about life as that life comes to an end?

Wit | Open Library

The immediacy of the presentation, and the clarity and elegance of Edson's writing, make this sophisticated, multilayered play accessible to almost any interested reader.

As the play begins, Vivian Bearing, a ren… More…. As the play begins, Vivian Bearing, a renowned professor of English who has spent years studying and teaching the intricate, difficult Holy Sonnets of the seventeenth-century poet John Donne, is diagnosed with advanced ovarian cancer. Confident of her ability to stay in control of events, she brings to her illness the same intensely rational and painstakingly methodical approach that has guided her stellar academic career.

But as her disease and its excruciatingly painful treatment inexorably progress, she begins to question the single-minded values and standards that have always directed her, finally coming to understand the aspects of life that make it truly worth living.

An original and urgent work of art.

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