Miguel street naipaul pdf

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Miguel Street is the first fictional work to have been written by. V.S, Naipaul. It was published in The book consists of seventeen short stories narrated by. Get news about Literary Fiction books, authors, and more. “Miguel Street is the Bowery, the Tenderloin, and the Catfish Row of Trinidad’s Port of Spain–its citizens a loony multitude whose knavery often rises from real kinship with pathos and tragedy Naipaul is at his. PDF | Sir Vidiadhar Surajprasad (V.S. Naipaul) was born in Trinidad in Miguel Street is a place where all the tragic moments happen in the novel.

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Miguel Street Naipaul Pdf

V.S. NAIPAUL Miguel Street V. S. Naipaul was born in Trinidad in He went to England on a scholarship in After four years at Oxford he began to. To the residents of Miguel Street, a derelict corner of Trinidad's capital, their neighbourhood is a complete world, where everybody is quite different from. Miguel Street by V.S. Naipaul. The History of Trinidad. Trinidad was inhabited by Carib and Arawak people long before Christopher Columbus arrived, but the.

The Caribbean islands are also called the home of the noble savage because they were islands of primitive men. These islands have no large mass of land and are distant from the rest of the world. The attachment of the dwellers to their individual islands have been a problem to growth of a broader and unified Caribbean culture. To most Caribbean writers their landscapes are important aspect of literature. The Caribbean writers have similar issues that they raise in their text because they share similar social, economical, political and historical challenges. This is because literature writers write texts that mirror their societies. Issues that are raised in literary texts from the Caribbean texts vary from discrimination, role of women, violence, weak family units and disillusionment. Brother Man is a novel by Roger Mais, a Jamaican novelist published in The novel is written in prose with a layout that is seemingly cinematic and episodic; little is done to describe the environment beyond the claustrophobic ghetto of 'The Lane' in the slums of Kingston, Jamaica. It is the story of G. The novel is also seen as the story of the Caribbean as well as the coming of age story of G. Miguel Street, by V. The sketches are written lightly, so that tragedy is understated and comedy is overstated, yet the ring of truth always prevails.
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Very interestingly, the scholar stresses the need to investigate language structures through music. In other words, calypsoes are a culture-bound artistic form of expression and as such they are almost on the verge of untranslatability.

No song composed outside Trinidad is a calypso. The calypso deals with local incidents, local attitudes, and it does so in a local language. More particularly, the Italian translation of Miguel Street shows that a twofold difficulty arises: firstly, the translator needs to decide how to reproduce the colloquial liveliness of the Creole language used for calypsoes and, secondly, how to translate into Italian the manifold cultural data that all those popular ditties convey 3.

As in all popular cultures, those people heavily rely on orality as the most direct instrument of daily communication, hence the importance of long dialogues and the obsessive quotations from calypsoes. In Miguel Street, calypsoes epitomize both the importance of orality in the spreading of social and cultural shared values and a functional fusion among words, music and orality.

Thus, since calypsoes represent the highest achievement of West Indian orality, they could be properly translated into Italian by resorting to the rich linguistic resources of a spoken register in the target language 4.

However, although the Italian translation is far from the fluent rhythm of the English text, there is a lexical gain which allows the retrieval of at least the oral and informal tone of the original calypso. Thus, its omission in the Italian version is not a painless loss, since the non-standard spelling of the word in the calypso is a linguistic marker that highlights the importance of orality for Miguel Street inhabitants. Unfortunately, the Italian translation grasps only the denotative meaning, but misses the metaphorical one which is essential for a true comprehension of the calypso quotation.

Miguel Street- A literary analysis on Society and Masculine Identities | MythoughtsExactly

Obviously enough, the Italian reader has been deprived not only of a smooth and aesthetically pleasing translation, but also of the derogatory force of this culture-bound expression, with all the chain of connotations it arises. For example, the calypso quotations taken into account show that all the interjections have been constantly omitted in the target text; as a result, the Italian translation sounds somewhat detached from the frankness and informality of the original texts. Haut de page Bibliographie Alleyne, M.

Allsopp, R. Kingston, University of the West Indies Press. Brathwaite, E.

Collins, J. Constance, Z. Crowley, D. Cowley, J. Dash, J. M, , Postcolonial Caribbean identities, in Irele, F. Gikandi, eds. Dudley, S. Gunner, L. Hendry, J. Watson eds. Hill, D. Hill, E.

Irele, F. Gikandi eds. Liverpool, H. Calypsoes as epitome of african orality in the Caribbean 1Due to complex and often traumatic historical processes, the Caribbean region has been shaped as a space of hybridity and creolization, cross-cultural encounter and interracial coexistence.

The Caribbean is a highly syncretic place, where the heterogeneous and scattered genesis of its population has brought together people of different descent: native Caribs and Amerindians, Africans and Indians, European, Chinese, and other Middle-Eastern minorities. Nevertheless, in spite of this ethnic and cultural plurality, the African presence informs the core of the region and gives shape to its innermost identity.

Today, the weight of this African legacy in the West Indies emerges more substantially in some forms of Creole-based orature, including both poetry and music, which are deeply influenced by the African oral tradition.

Miguel Street

This is, for example, the singular artistic experience of the Barbadian oral poet Bruce St. John , who wrote and performed his poetry in the so-called Bajan speech, a Creole resulting from the fusion of Standard English and other West African languages. Undoubtedly, calypsoes belong to the many-faceted field of Caribbean orature, where the influences of the African diaspora have been more enduring. Thus, calypsoes can be considered as an African-derived form of folklore, which expresses a distinctive African sensibility in the mingling of music, dance and orality.

Similarly to other forms of African expression, calypsoes have an extempore nature and are based on musical and textual improvisation, although nowadays calypso competitions are less spontaneous events than they were in the past, to such an extent that true extempore performances are really rare today 2.

In addition to these improvisational features, Crowley argues that calypsoes descended from the African tradition of satiric songs; moreover, even after formal emancipation from slavery, this musical genre continued to be perceived as a means of artistic resistance to exploitation and oppression. More specifically, Gordon Rohlehr traces the source of the political Trinidadian calypso in this kind of antiphonal African songs, which often exercised a function of social control: it is now fully acknowledged that criticism of political leaders or complaints about other reasons of unrest, turbulence and instability were only possible within the restricted area of orature, through oral songs and stories.

Moreover, Naipaul depicts how calypsoes reflected and contributed to redefine the Trinidadian society during the Second World War and in the post-war period, when unexpected changes deeply affected the lower strata of Port of Spain population, especially an increased migration of Indians from rural places to towns, the process of acculturation for younger generations, the American military occupation which induced Indian women to offer sex as an easy commodity in exchange for the Yankee dollar.

Ultimately, calypsoes prove useful to humorously show and mercilessly amplify the domestic dramas of everyday life in the degraded suburbs of Port of Spain, where people vainly strive for a heroic stature they are unable to attain; instead, they are doomed to failure and frustration, misfortune and vulnerability, disillusionment and alienation. Very interestingly, the scholar stresses the need to investigate language structures through music.

In other words, calypsoes are a culture-bound artistic form of expression and as such they are almost on the verge of untranslatability. No song composed outside Trinidad is a calypso. The calypso deals with local incidents, local attitudes, and it does so in a local language.

More particularly, the Italian translation of Miguel Street shows that a twofold difficulty arises: firstly, the translator needs to decide how to reproduce the colloquial liveliness of the Creole language used for calypsoes and, secondly, how to translate into Italian the manifold cultural data that all those popular ditties convey 3. As in all popular cultures, those people heavily rely on orality as the most direct instrument of daily communication, hence the importance of long dialogues and the obsessive quotations from calypsoes.

In Miguel Street, calypsoes epitomize both the importance of orality in the spreading of social and cultural shared values and a functional fusion among words, music and orality. Thus, since calypsoes represent the highest achievement of West Indian orality, they could be properly translated into Italian by resorting to the rich linguistic resources of a spoken register in the target language 4.

However, although the Italian translation is far from the fluent rhythm of the English text, there is a lexical gain which allows the retrieval of at least the oral and informal tone of the original calypso.

Thus, its omission in the Italian version is not a painless loss, since the non-standard spelling of the word in the calypso is a linguistic marker that highlights the importance of orality for Miguel Street inhabitants. Unfortunately, the Italian translation grasps only the denotative meaning, but misses the metaphorical one which is essential for a true comprehension of the calypso quotation.

Obviously enough, the Italian reader has been deprived not only of a smooth and aesthetically pleasing translation, but also of the derogatory force of this culture-bound expression, with all the chain of connotations it arises. For example, the calypso quotations taken into account show that all the interjections have been constantly omitted in the target text; as a result, the Italian translation sounds somewhat detached from the frankness and informality of the original texts.

Haut de page Bibliographie Alleyne, M. Allsopp, R. Kingston, University of the West Indies Press. Brathwaite, E.

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Collins, J. Constance, Z. Crowley, D.

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