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As the words at work suggest, Peter Seibel focuses on how his interviewees tackle the today in Coders at Work, offering a brand-new companion volume to Apress s Скачать эту книгу (k) в формате: fb2, lrf, epub, mobi, txt, html. Based on nearly eighty hours of conversations with fifteen all-time great programmers and computer scientists, the Q&A interviews in Coders at Work provide a. Coders at Work: Reflections on the Craft of Programming pdf download ebookCoders at Work: Reflections on the Craft of Programming ePUB Coders at Work.

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Coders At Work Epub

Oct 22, GitHub is home to over 36 million developers working together to host .. Agile Android Software Development - Etienne Savard (PDF, epub, mobi) The Busy Coder's Guide to Android Development (PDF - older versions). Books coders at work reflections on the craft of programming peter seibel We peruse the unimpeachable altering of this ebook in txt, DjVu, ePub,PDF, dr. activity. Power up your mind: learn faster, work smarter / Bill Lucas. p. cm. ways in which you can power The Clean Coder. Pages·· MB·1, Downloads.

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Reflections on the Craft of Programming Full Books 1. Reflections on the Craft of Programming Full Books 2. Book Details Author: P Seibel Pages: Apress Brand: English ISBN: Publication Date: Reflections on the Craft of Programming, full book Coders at Work: Reflections on the Craft of Programming, online free Coders at Work: Reflections on the Craft of Programming, pdf download Coders at Work: Reflections on the Craft of Programming, pdf Coders at Work: Reflections on the Craft of Programming pdf read online, Coders at Work: Reflections on the Craft of Programming Book Download 4.

I'm planning of studying independently because in my country the Computer Science study plan is a joke a friend who went 2 years and then dropped told me. I have to agree with dragonmouth, it seems a little disrespectful that you just took a few programming books and then put them together as a post, where is the context for this particular piece?

Are you saying that after I read all nine books I'll become a pro? Sadly, each book is for a different language. It's a collection of high quality programming books that happen to be available for free. Nothing more. Consider it a la carte: Just put these books under your pillow one by one and in nine nights you'll be a crack programmer. Don't Make My Think - an incredible examination of web usability. A bit dated, but still current and valid. Pro Bash Programming - Because everyone needs to know how to shell-script.

Doing it well is an art, however. The Good Parts - Because Javascript is a horrible language, and learning how to work around its vagaries of idiosyncrasies is an artform. Nice suggestions! They look interesting but are they actually free?

I did some quick searches but couldn't find free versions of them anywhere outside of piracy sites, unfortunately. The Good Parts is, I think.

The others? Still important - nay, vital - programming books. Top Deals. Email Facebook Whatsapp Pinterest Twitter. Enjoyed this article? Stay informed by joining our newsletter! Enter your Email. Read our privacy policy.

Not all these 9 books are free I guess From the author of Thinking in Java, there's also: So does business information system major count towards a programming career? Indeed a very good list, but you missed couple of classics like Clean Code. Can't believe I missed that.

Thanks for clarifying! Learn the market before you try to serve it. Great piece Joel.

Allow me to add a few others! Scroll down for the next article. Jul 23, Vladimir rated it it was amazing. I loved it. It also presents with a good overview of the history of CS. Dec 05, Michael rated it it was amazing Shelves: The best book that I read all year was also the best book I read all year.

Oct 31, Mahdi Hosseini rated it it was amazing. Easy read and nice interviews. My favorite part was interview with Peter Norvig. The questions being asked were all relevant to the background of interviewee. Also this book gives you a grasp of functional programming worlds vs Object oriented style as well. I enjoyed it and learnt from it. Aug 28, Nathan Glenn rated it it was amazing.

This was an awesome read. It contains 15 interviews with programmers of well-known skill, giving their opinion on history, current state and future, sharing their valuable and now unobtainable experience programming with wires, switches and punch cards, and explaining what programming means to them personally. The historical vie This was an awesome read. The historical views offered are quite valuable. Many of the speakers have strong negative opinions about technologies that are quite standard now: The speakers show that sometimes technology has regressed, and they wish they could have back some of the methods used in the 60's and 70's.

It's funny to see that if Perl is mentioned, they either hate it or love it. Java gets mostly negative comments, though a number of the authors work in it regularly.

Python is mostly positive, I think. The one that stands out is Haskell, which, of those who mention it, mostly adore it one speaker is cautious, saying that it is not a cure-all, though still an improvement. They share war stories about tracing down bugs; what they think makes a great programmer and how they interview; how they work and how they dive into a new code base; what they think of Knuth, his books, and literate programming; how they started programming and what original sources or texts they recommend to budding programmers; artist, scientist, craftsman or writer; and plenty more.

The bibliography is nice, but I can't help but think that many sources are mentioned by the speakers but not provided there. Also, the text does not contain references to the bibliography, which makes it harder to use. Actually, what I really want is an index. Hundreds of topics must be covered, and the speakers kind of blur together in my mind. Without an index, there's no way for me to really go back and review specific points.

I just have to read it again though that might not be so bad. All of the chapters are good, but my favorites are Guy Steele and Bernie Cosell. Guy Steele sort of mesmerizes with his imagination of what might be possible in a programming language. Bernie Cosell is extremely pragmatic about code maintenance, and is known for being a master debugger. However, he believes that this reputation is slightly misplaced: Then the bug is gone, and he is hailed as the bug squasher.

Coders at Work: Reflections on the Craft of Programming by Peter Seibel

He also explains how when he worked for the government and could never get budget approvals for updating designs, he would just update the software design as part of a bug fix, moving the design closer to what was needed. Siebel asks: The Knuth chapter also contains the best explanation and motivation of literate programming I've ever read; it really made it click, being at the end of a book containing differing opinions and opines of software writing practices.

Knuth also explains that TeX is only Turing-complete because the users required it and he had to force in the additional features "kicking and screaming.

Mar 10, Andrew Leschinsky rated it it was amazing. This is probably the best non-technical book on software I have every read, the interviews are amazing - mostly because the people interviewed are total rockstars. The book provides a great indirect overview of industry as a whole.

Coders at Work: Reflections on the craft of programming

For me personally, working mostly on the web it's too easy to lose sight of the big picture, how huge the world of software really is, how different the challenges are, and how prominent and brilliant are the industry leaders. Highly recommend this one.

Sep 21, Tom rated it it was amazing. If you are thinking about being a programmer, pick any interview from this book and read it. If, after reading it, you aren't excited about programming, then just stop.

This is the best book I've ever read that gets inside the mind of a great programmer. True greats, the pioneers of computer science and industry achievement.

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I learned things about programming, such as the usefulness of monads and closures, that had been previously under appreciated.

I found the interviewees to be extremely candid If you are thinking about being a programmer, pick any interview from this book and read it. I found the interviewees to be extremely candid, with profound answers to such questions as "do you think programming is a young person's game" with a variety of answers and "do you think of yourself as a craftsman, engineer, scientist or artist?

I enjoyed hearing Dan Ingalls implementer of several versions of Smalltalk talk about teaching a new programmer by tapping into their inner passions, vs. I particularly enjoyed reading the Guy Steele interview. Guy, co-creator of Common Lisp and Scheme, talks about magic and programming pp We speak of computing wizards and we think of things happening by magic or automagically.

And I think that's because being able to get a machine to do what you want is the closest thing we've got in technology to adolescent wish-fulfillment. I would recommend it to any programmer, old or new. You don't have to read it all straight through either Apr 19, Jim rated it it was amazing. A great collection of interviews with fifteen different programmers, conducted by a programmer.

It's been a long time since I've read a technical book that really resonated with me, but this is one of them. I picked up this book on the recommendation of a programmer who included it in a small collection of great books about programming that included 'The C Programming Language' and 'Programming Pearls' -- two of my favorites. I wasn't disappointed. The collection of programmers here includes a nu A great collection of interviews with fifteen different programmers, conducted by a programmer.

While there is a vast array of opinions here, a few common themes emerge: Increasingly so as web applications make debugging more complicated. The programmer I felt the most affinity for was Ken Thompson, who has long been a hero of mine. I found his willingness to rewrite an abhorrence for some programmers, who wish to create eternal art refreshing.

I loved Zawinski's paean to the lowly screensaver. Jan 14, Christoffer Ventus rated it really liked it.

This book is made out of interviews with influential and well known people from both the academical side and from the industry of software development.

It gives the reader a good glimpse of how these people conduct their work and their history with programming and computer science. It was very rewarding and inspiring at times and also burst some bubbles about these hero coders. A lot of the interviewed people are computer language creators or evangelists Steele, Armstrong, Allen and many have This book is made out of interviews with influential and well known people from both the academical side and from the industry of software development.

A lot of the interviewed people are computer language creators or evangelists Steele, Armstrong, Allen and many have some connection with Lisp, which I suppose Seibel is interested in. But there was enough variety not to make it a book on computer language design. Some of the people used or liked it, but most didn't.

It did not enhance the text in any way. At least there was no vi vs. Mar 26, Josh rated it liked it Shelves: Not quite what I expected. I was hoping for more information and less blathering--"I worked here, then here, and then I went back to that one place because they offered more vacation time.

Then I quit again because I didn't like it anymore. Then I had a kid. Then I stopped programming. I can't say I learned much from this book, and since the vast majori Not quite what I expected. I can't say I learned much from this book, and since the vast majority of the important stuff has been discussed at length elsewhere, I suggest reading something else, unless you're really interested in these programmers' curriculum vitae.

Jan 26, Gabi rated it really liked it. I'm not saying that my code is as good as Bernie Cossell's but, as it turns out, I work like he used to. I try to think many steps ahead, I use any change in the client's requirements as a good excuse to fix things that actually work, then feel guilty about the time spent that way but stay hopeful that the resulting increase in elegance and reliability will somehow pay off someday.

I'm happy he approves of doing business that way, though it's discouraging that he gave up on the whole field. I'm I'm not saying that my code is as good as Bernie Cossell's but, as it turns out, I work like he used to.

I'm just getting started, and I have the added burden of impending middle age. Nov 08, Bob Grommes rated it it was amazing.

Coders Work

A must-read for any software developer, this book consists of at-length interviews with top talent in the craft. This book drives home that software development is about clear, literate communication and deep thinking about philosophical approaches to problem solving, as much as it's about tools and techniques. It'll also be eye-opening for some to see some of the popular fads and fetishes that these experts call "BS" on.

As s software developer I found this book inspiring, invigorating and valid A must-read for any software developer, this book consists of at-length interviews with top talent in the craft. As s software developer I found this book inspiring, invigorating and validating.

Mar 28, Michael Hirsch rated it really liked it Shelves: Very good interviews with well known coders. They were all over the spectrum--from some folks who never graduated college, to Stanford professor Knuth. It was good to see how such a disparate group answered the same questions in such different ways. I liked thinking about whether I would want this or that person, who is a far better programmer than I, in my team. There were some I definitely don't want even while I respect their ability.

Jul 11, Ahmed rated it really liked it. If you're into Computer Science or Programming is a good book to have on the nightstand and come back to it at least once a week to read a chapter.

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