Steve waugh autobiography ebook

Date published 

 

Death by Silence_Out of My Comfort Zone_Steve Waugh. Uploaded by tcwj. A short extract from a chapter in Steve Waugh's autobiography for the purposes of. Rarely does a truly great player reveal as much of himself and his sport as does Steve Waugh in his long awaited autobiography. 'Out of my. Rarely does a truly great player reveal as much of himself and his sport as does Steve Waugh in his long awaited autobiography. "Out of my Comfort Zone" is a.

Author:KATHE CARRECTER
Language:English, Spanish, Japanese
Country:Latvia
Genre:Personal Growth
Pages:344
Published (Last):19.06.2016
ISBN:188-9-28397-932-5
Distribution:Free* [*Registration needed]
Uploaded by: MIRIAN

59537 downloads 141396 Views 17.48MB ePub Size Report


Steve Waugh Autobiography Ebook

Steve Waugh to me was the model cricketer. Tough, relentless and committed to the teams objective. He was not as graceful as his brother or Brian Lara, he was. Rarely does a truly great player reveal as much of himself and his sport as Steve Waugh does in his long-awaited aracer.mobi opens up on his. The Age Rarely does a truly great player reveal as much of himself and his sport as Steve Waugh does in his long-awaited autobiography.

However, regardless of which side of the fence you happen to be, the one thing that you cannot deny is the fact that they are, without fear of contradiction, the number one side in the world in both forms of the game. The Australian brand of cricket is professional, ruthless and bold. They would rather lose trying to win than play for a draw. And win they do, with a consistency to be admired and one that is unmatched by their rivals. In developing their winning culture, they have transformed the way test cricket is played and have become the benchmark for the chasing pack. But cricket, as with life, is seasonal. Embedded in the rise and ascendancy of the Australians are some valuable lessons for leaders everywhere. By the time Waugh inherited the captaincy of the test side from Tubby Taylor in , Australian cricket already enjoyed worldwide dominance. Getting to that point had entailed putting in place a very deliberate process. It was a process that required patience, commitment and consistent application, all of which were fuelled by the desire to be the best. Waugh described the role of captain as one that required him to be an advisor, mentor, friend, psychologist, mediator, spokesperson, politician and selector. Dexterity, flexibility and an ability to recognise what role is required are skills that are integral to savvy leadership.

Even the mild-mannered, clear-thinking Taylor remonstrated with Malik for having the temerity to appeal and then to carry it on until the decision was reversed. Only the calmest of temperaments and clearest of thinkers could hope to do well now, for the atmosphere in the room was charged with negativity and distrust. I waited for my turn in the middle as if I was about to be summoned to the electric chair.

Appropriately, I made 13, and for the second time in the match felt like a prop on a movie set.

I was given out stumped, but by the time the keeper took the ball I had retreated to the crease with plenty of time to spare, which to the umpire was totally irrelevant, as he sent me on my way.

I just walked in and sat down, numb.

Out of My Comfort Zone : The Autobiography by Steve Waugh | | Booktopia

Instead, I was stuck in an ordeal that was spiralling out of control. The massacre ended in an innings and runs defeat, but the mayhem was just about to begin.

We are not going to be allowed to win. We will talk long and hard about the rest of the tour, because the ramifications of us going home now are huge and we understand that, no matter what was said, it would look like sour grapes after losing. But, ultimately, somebody has to take a stand, because this sort of thing has been going on for too long. If we are the ones who have to cop it, then so be it.

In the end, the captain, coach and manager took the brunt of the criticism we copped; it was courageous if not wise move to encourage a boycott. A show of hands was called and only two players — Tony Dodemaide and Jamie Siddons — were seemingly unaffected and had the strength of character to want to stay on. Being first-time tourists and not wanting to jeopardize future selection chances may have influenced their vote, but it was a brave stance nevertheless.

Col Egar had the task of passing on the information to Malcolm Gray. In Faisalabad the next day another emergency team meeting was called and Col informed us that there was no way we were going to be allowed to abandon the tour: it must progress as scheduled.

We felt let down, but deep down we also knew that, cricket politics being what they are, the ACB had no alternative but to deny out request. In many ways, it was good to know that our only option was to just get on with it. Brian Scovell's affectionate biography of Jim Laker, 19 for 90, marks the 50th anniversary of Laker's famous match and shows occasional signs of being hurriedly constructed.

But it is full of useful information: Laker emerges as his own man, a difficult customer never afraid to take on authority.

Wisden itself offers more in the bookshops once again than just the almanack. Stephen Moss's Wisden Anthology Cricket's Age of Revolution is an important and scholarly work, which can be read for pleasure and instruction for days on end. A literary as much as a cricketing achievement, the joy of this massive book is its detail and sensible judgment. Gideon Haigh has edited a selection of the almanack's obituaries, entitled Peter the Lord's Cat.

It is full of unexpected information: the scientist Victor Rothschild and the playwright Terence Rattigan put on 68 when opening the batting together for Harrow against Eton at Lord's in ; the novelist John Fowles and Trevor Bailey once cycled together to lessons at Alleyn Court Prep School; and the socialist leader H. Hyndman was a very useful batsman for Cambridge University and Sussex.

This small book is among other things a social history of Britain. It fills a yawning gap in the market by producing short profiles and career statistics for the top players currently playing Test cricket. Even the visiting Sri Lankan or Bangladeshi squads should no longer hold mysteries to owners of this well-researched volume, which will surely become indispensable to both journalists and fans.

The post-Ashes deluge of England-related books has not entirely dried up. Andrew Strauss might come to regret writing an autobiography less than three years after his Test debut.

But he shows enough with this level-headed volume, Coming into Play, to suggest that in due course he might well be capable of producing a worthwhile book. Pietersen demonstrates a primitive understanding of the complexities of post-apartheid South Africa: his assertion that he was forced out by racial quotas is at best dubious and at worst self-serving. It is hard to overstate the banality of the ghosted prose: at one point he informs the reader that "I like to download the clothes I like.

Two much better autobiographies have come out of Pakistan. That fine allrounder of a generation ago, Mushtaq Mohammad, has produced a work of charm and quality. There are at least two extraordinary facts about Mushtaq.

out of My Comfort Zone The Autobiography Steve Waugh 014300574x

The first concerns family: three brothers also played for Pakistan. They were forced to move from India after Partition and lived for many years inside a Hindu temple until better accommodation became available thanks to the cricketing success of elder brother Hanif. And supposedly Mushtaq played Test cricket aged just 15 years and days, having played first-class cricket as a year-old. These incredible statistics may indeed be incredible. My mother never had a birth certificate for me.

The other famous leg-spinning Mushtaq - Mushtaq Ahmed - had to put up with a great deal from the Pakistan team management and various captains he served under.

His book, Twenty20 Vision, provides a withering analysis of the faults of Javed Miandad, Wasim Akram "rude and critical of players in the field, even if they were giving him everything they had" , and others. Only Imran Khan who wrote the foreword is exempt from criticism. At the heart of this book is the moral and emotional collapse which Mushtaq Ahmed seems to have suffered while playing for Somerset.

He found his way out of his personal morass by wholeheartedly embracing Islam.

Death by Silence_Out of My Comfort Zone_Steve Waugh

His account of what Islam means to him is extremely moving, and its importance stretches beyond cricket. His journey is about love and forgiveness. Wasim Khan's autobiography, Brim Full of Passion, deals with failure. It tells the story of how, as a Birmingham-born Pakistani, he broke into the Warwickshire team when it was at its peak in the early s and came close to establishing himself as an outstanding county cricketer.

A series of factors - bad luck, personality clashes, injury, lack of opportunity - held him back. Eventually, after an unhappy move to Sussex, he was forced to give up the first-class game.

It may not be an atypical story and, as such, conveys the quiet despair of the struggling county pro. It reminds the reader that there is often far more turmoil and drama going on in the head of the unknown young cricketer trying to keep his place than in the big name striding confidently to the wicket. Wasim Khan's book, well ghosted by Alan Wilkinson and produced by a publishing house in Derby, also provides a rare account of what it is like to be a young Pakistani growing up in a deprived area of Birmingham.

And the wonderful thing about him is that throughout he retained his enthusiasm. Embedded in the rise and ascendancy of the Australians are some valuable lessons for leaders everywhere. By the time Waugh inherited the captaincy of the test side from Tubby Taylor in , Australian cricket already enjoyed worldwide dominance.

Getting to that point had entailed putting in place a very deliberate process. It was a process that required patience, commitment and consistent application, all of which were fuelled by the desire to be the best. Waugh described the role of captain as one that required him to be an advisor, mentor, friend, psychologist, mediator, spokesperson, politician and selector. Dexterity, flexibility and an ability to recognise what role is required are skills that are integral to savvy leadership.

The normal corporate environment is a cacophony of diversity that demands of leaders the ability to respond in a variety of ways. This requires leaders to exhibit a great degree of emotional intelligence, understanding and sensitivity. It could be an interesting exercise to make a list of the various roles you as a leader have been required to play over the past four months and then to examine your performance as you have done so. Valuable questions then include: Which roles require further development?

Which are the roles that energize and which have been the ones that have drained energy? What roles are needed, but are missing?

Here then are lessons that savvy leaders can take from the Steve Waugh story: Create a healthy work environment. Creating a healthy work environment is not something that can be achieved overnight.

It requires consistency and a clear picture of the environment that one is trying to create. Working off clearly articulated values is one way to guide the creation of an environment that will reflect such ideals.

Often companies succeed in articulating the values only to fail in the follow through of then building an environment that embodies those values. That failure becomes the breeding ground for cynicism, bad morale and a lack of motivation. Waugh constantly sought to challenge, stimulate and provoke those around him to ensure the creation of a healthy work environment. As most leaders can attest too, at times this can be a thankless task!

When it comes to bricks and mortar, Googleplex, the colourful Silicon Valley corporate head office of Google, where staff can receive a daily free massage stands as a testimony to what a healthy work environment looks like.

Sergey Brin and Larry Page spared no expense in building a place people wanted to be and an environment that catered for almost their every need. Of course, a healthy work environment extends beyond the bricks and mortar, but that might not be a bad place to start in order to show some sort of intent in the quest to breed a winning culture! Respect the past but initiate new processes.

As an Australian cricketer and captain, Waugh was very conscious of being part of something bigger. He sought to honour the past and its traditions without becoming ensnared by the same. For Waugh, the cap symbolized all that Australian cricket stood for and represented. Waugh introduced the idea of former players presenting the cap to debutants which was a deliberate attempt to link the present with the past and draw inspiration from that which had gone before. Somehow Waugh seemed to manage the tension between respecting the past yet introducing new initiatives.

It is a balance leaders would do well to replicate. The challenge of course being that there can be no formula to follow: each has to discover and navigate their own path in attempting this balance. Empower those around you. Waugh regarded a major part of his captaincy role to be the empowerment his players by re-enforcing positive messages and providing opportunities.

This is an obvious strategy but there is an important precursor to such a strategy, namely, getting to know those around you first.

New Steve Waugh book to be sold exclusively through BIG W, Woolworths; industry responds

Knowing the strengths, weaknesses, values and viewpoints of those around you are important if appropriate opportunities are to be created. He believed that faith and support was all that a talented individual needed within a team environment and took any opportunity to praise his players. Re-enforce positive messages and providing opportunities builds confidence — a vital ingredient for any sportsperson.

Waugh believed that as captain he could make things happen if he instilled belief and planted seeds of hope in those he led. Why would it be any different in a corporate environment? Be flexible and embrace variety.

In other words, get everyone out of the comfort zone. He describes how the responsibility of leadership consistently challenged his personal comfort zones as he was required to perform roles to which he was unaccustomed.

You might also like: LIARS POKER EBOOK

For any leader, the obvious result of a willingness to embrace flexibility and variety, is personal growth. For the company as a whole, the ability to be flexible is a critical determining factor in building and sustaining success.

Learning companies are those where the need to be flexible is taken as a given. Commitment and accountability are non-negotiable. Waugh firmly believed that assuming personal and collective responsibility led to success.