Vatsayana kamasutra full book


 

Kamasutra. VATSYAYANA. Page 2. This book has been created to be read in a full screen literature, and which is called the `Vatsyayana Kama. Sutra', or. Nevertheless, not every person understands the genuine meaning this book has, For a more detailed overview, please, see the whole text of the Kamasutra book. by the philosopher and scientist of ancient India Vatsyayana Mallanaga. Book Source: Digital Library of India Item aracer.mobi: Vatsyayana aracer.mobiioned.

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Vatsayana Kamasutra Full Book

Kamasutra VATSYAYANA Page 2. This book has been created to be read in a full screen C:\staging\3B0AC. Kamasutra book pdf with real pictures. Read “The Kamasutra (Translated)”, by Vatsyayana online on Bookmate – The and readable English translation; fifty full-page illustrations using period clothing, . The ideas and practices in this book should not be followed or attempted. Read Kama Sutra Of Vatsayana book reviews & author details and more at Sold by: Grover Book & Stationery Co. . Kamasutra (Oxford World's Classics).

It was composed by Vatsyayana Mallanaga, possibly in the third century CE and has since been the subject of commentaries, criticisms, and translations. Vatsyayana drew on many scholars before him, and this text is certainly not the only of its kind. In the west, the book is often perceived as a catalogue of sex positions. For Hindus, it is a unique and elaborate text containing several books on topics such as finding and pleasing a wife, and the use of drugs and other substances to enhance kama. However, a more recent translation by Wendy Doniger and Sudhir Kakar provides a fresh insight into the discussions of the Kamasutra, its nature, its function as a religious text, and the argument of whether it is to be a descriptive versus prescriptive text. Of course, in ancient India and even today, the reader should decide with discretion. The translation by Doniger and Kakar was used for this summary.

Relationships between men and women. What they should be? Myths of the Kamasutra The main misapprehensions, which a modern human may have concerning the sense and content of the Kamasutra, are based on the initial impression experienced by the Europeans and provoked by a translation of the book in the end of XIX century.

This book is about sexual pleasure the compendium of sex positions. The rest tells us about a deliberate and general investigation of genders in their mere diversity.

The Kamasutra contains pictures. It should be noted, that the book contains almost none of the original illustrations. Everything, that a single publication may propose, is just a simple fake.

Those images appeared in the book on their way to Europe. Frequently, instead of illustrations, a reader sees some samples of the Mongolian pictorial art.

Vatsayana Kamsutra (English)

You can read more about the features that caused such a delusion here. It is the only book dedicated to the art of love of that time.

In deed and not in name, as we have already mentioned, the Kamasutra represents not an original piece of work, but a compilation and revision of previously existing texts written by other authors on the topic. It is evident through the repeated references in the text of the Kama Sutra made to the various authors, in particular, Shatavahana and many others.

Translator: Ludo Rocher [60] Across human cultures, states Michel Foucault, "the truth of sex" has been produced and shared by two processes. One method has been ars erotica texts, while the other has been the scientia sexualis literature. The first are typically of the hidden variety and shared by one person to another, between friends or from a master to a student, focusing on the emotions and experience, sans physiology.

These bury many of the truths about sex and human sexual nature.

It discusses, in its distilled form, the physiology, the emotions and the experience while citing and quoting prior Sanskrit scholarship on the nature of kama. Doniger describes them as a "kind of atomic string thread of meanings", which are so cryptic that any translation is more like deciphering and filling in the text. The stereotypical image of the text is one where erotic pursuit with sexual intercourse include improbable contortionist forms.

The Kamasutra (Translated)

It is also a psychological treatise that presents the effect of desire and pleasure on human behavior. According to Shastri, as quoted by Doniger, the text analyses "the inclinations of men, good and bad", thereafter it presents Vatsyayana's recommendation and arguments of what one must avoid as well as what to not miss in experiencing and enjoying, with "acting only on the good". The text, according to Doniger, clearly states "that a treatise demands the inclusion of everything, good or bad", but after being informed with in-depth knowledge, one must "reflect and accept only the good".

The approach found in the text is one where goals of science and religion should not be to repress, but to encyclopedically know and understand, thereafter let the individual make the choice. In the party, a poem should be read with parts missing, and the guests should compete to creatively complete the poem. The boy should dive into the water away from the girl he is interested in, then swim underwater to get close to her, emerge out of the water and surprise her, touch her slightly and then dive again, away from her.

The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana by Mallanaga Vātsyāyana

The book's opening verse declares marriage to be a conducive means to "a pure and natural love between the partners", states Upadhyaya. It suggests involving one's friends and relatives in the search, and meeting the current friends and relatives of one's future partner prior to the marriage.

Vatsyayana recommends, states Alain Danielou, that "one should play, marry, associate with one's equals, people of one's own circle" who share the same values and religious outlook.

It is more difficult to manage a good, happy relationship when there are basic differences between the two, according to verse 3. For example, the text discusses eight forms of alingana embrace in verses 2.

The last four are forms of embrace recommended by Vatsyayana to increase pleasure during foreplay and during sexual intimacy. Vatsyayana cites earlier — now lost — Indian texts from the Babhraya's school, for these eight categories of embraces. The various forms of intimacy reflect the intent and provide means to engage a combination of senses for pleasure.

For instance, according to Vatsyayana the lalatika form enables both to feel each other and allows the man to visually appreciate "the full beauty of the female form", states S. The territory of the text extends only so far as men have dull appetites; but when the wheel of sexual ecstasy is in full motion, there is no textbook at all, and no order. Vatsyayana also mentions variations in kissing cultures in different parts of ancient India. During sex, the text recommends going with the flow and mirroring with abhiyoga and samprayoga.

It also explains the signs and reasons a woman wants to enter into an adulterous relationship and when she does not want to commit adultery. It shows a "near total disregard of class varna and caste jati ", states Doniger.

In the pages of the Kamasutra, lovers are "not upper-class" but they "must be rich" enough to dress well, pursue social leisure activities, buy gifts and surprise the lover. In the rare mention of caste found in the text, it is about a man finding his legal wife and the advice that humorous stories to seduce a woman should be about "other virgins of same jati caste ".

In general, the text describes sexual activity between men and women across class and caste, both in urban and rural settings. In Redeeming the Kamasutra, Doniger states that "the Kamasutra departs from the dharmic view of homosexuality in significant ways", where the term kliba appears. In contemporary translations, this has been inaccurately rendered as "eunuch" — or, a castrated man in a harem, [note 1] a practice that started in India after the arrival of Turkish Sultans.